Nikko To-sho-gu

As I was in the school years, I visited this place a couple times. I looked back then, I did not know what the real meaning of this place and the places where are surrounding area. I have started deeply rearizing the meaning and trasitions and people’s perspectives that can reflect to people’s lives. The ideas are the accumulations of the culture and history. You can take take time and observe and absorb the culture itself, take deep breath and enjoy the moments  

Nikkō Tōshō-gū (日光東照宮) is a Shinto shrine located in Nikkō, Tochigi Prefecture, Japan. It is part of the “Shrines and Temples of Nikkō“, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

To-sho-gu is dedicated to Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate. Initially built in 1617, during the Edo period, while Ieyasu’s son Hidetada was shogun, it was enlarged during the time of the third shogun, Iemitsu. Ieyasu is enshrined here, and his remains are entombed here.

During the Edo period, the Tokugawa shogunate carried out stately processions from Edo to the Nikkō Tōshō-gū along the Nikkō Kaidō. The shrine’s annual spring and autumn festivals reenact these occasions, and are known as “processions of a thousand warriors.”

About keiko

Keiko Azuma is a food travel journalist, a nutritionist who loves to respect culture and food culture all over the world. Especially she wants to be an advocate to introduce Japanese Culture to the rest of the world. She is going to introduce current Japanese Culture and Foods and more. Please feel free to share your ideas where and what information you would like to know, hear, see and want to visit Japan.

02. November 2012 by keiko
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